The maple sugar season starts in the middle part of February and lasts until the middle part of April in NH. The sap will start to flow once the overnight temperatures dip below freezing and the day temps are over 35 degrees Fahrenheit including wind chill temperatures. It the weather is not precise, the sap will not flow. It will continue running, however, if daytime temps are in the 40ís and the temps from the previous night were in the 20ís.

During maple season, there are up to 1,000 maple producers in the state and they make close to 90,000 galloons of maple syrup. Those 90,000 gallons are over $4 million. With the maple syrup, the producers make pure maple syrup, confections and candies. It takes around 40 gallons of sap to make just one gallon of pure syrup.

Maple syrup facts:

A gallon of pure syrup is 11 pounds.
Maple syrup is all natural and 100% organic.
Early spring time is when the sap flows the heaviest and last anywhere from 10-20 days.
The sap itself has 2.5% of sugar content whereas the actual syrup contains 66% of sugar content.
Before a tree is tapped, producers will choose a tree that is 30 years old or more and at least 12 inches around.
Tapping a tree does not do any permanent damage to the tree since only 10% of a tree is actually tapped. Several maple trees have been tapped for more than 150 years.